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Air Quality


 

The Facts

Your exposure to air pollutants and toxic compounds may be 10 times higher inside your vehicle than in the outside air. It is estimated that the vehicle ahead of you emits half of the pollutants. Your highest daily exposure to air pollutants may be during your work commute.

Your exposure to air pollutants and toxic compounds may be 10 times higher inside your vehicle than in the outside air. It is estimated that the vehicle ahead of you emits half of the pollutants. Your highest daily exposure to air pollutants may be during your work commute.
Children breathe 50% more air per pound of body weight than adults.

Ground level ozone ruins rubber products like windshield wipers and tires, shortening their life by 25%

In the environment, ground-level ozone compromises the growth, reproduction, and overall health of plants and trees.

Exposure to ozone damages or weakens textile dyes and fibers, and some types of paint and coatings.

Every single day in the US, we drive over 6.3 billion miles compared to 2.4 billion miles in 1965. The increase in travel has offset much of the emission control progress.

An engine that has been sitting for an hour or more pollutes five times as much as a warm one.

Air Pollution Can...

  • Destroy plants and crops
  • Soil clothes, houses and automobiles.
  • Make paint peel and discolor.
  • Kill animals, and under certain conditions, humans.
  • Rust and tarnish metals.
  • Contribute to asthma, emphysema, lung cancer and bronchitis.
  • Reduce visibility and sunlight.
  • Deteriorates statues, monuments, and buildings.
  • Cause coughing, wheezing, chest pain and headaches.
  • Inhibit the body's immune system.
Common Air Pollutants
Ozone close to the ground—in the troposphere—has damaging effects on your health and on the environment. As the
main ingredient of smog, ozone can destroy your lung and airway tissue by actually burning through cell walls—
damaging your lungs much like the sun damages your skin!

Particulate Matter (PM-2.5)
Particulate Matter, or PM-2.5, refers to tiny particles that are smaller than 2.5 microns (smaller than the width of a
human hair).  Particulate matter has several sources including dirt kicked up into the air on paved and unpaved
roads, tires and brake linings as they wear down, smoke, vehicle tailpipe emissions, and earth moving activities. 
Because particulate matter is so very tiny, it easily bypasses your lung’s protective systems. 

Carbon Monoxide (CO)
Carbon Monoxide (CO) an odorless, tasteless, invisible, and poisonous gas, comes mostly from vehicle exhaust. 
Exposure to carbon monoxide reduces the ability of blood to carry oxygen through the body.  High levels of CO
exposure can cause headaches, dizziness, visual impairment, reduced manual dexterity and learning ability,
and even death.

Carbon monoxide reduces the delivery of oxygen to the body’s vital tissues, affecting the nervous system.
Consider this:
Would you rather spend ten minutes in a small room with one smoker or one running car?

Vehicle Emissions and the Air We Breathe...
The EPA has established the six major air pollutants that are most dangerous to public health and welfare:
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO2)
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)
  • Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)
  • Ozone (O3)
  • Particulate Matter (PM), and
  • Lead (Pb)
When gasoline and diesel fuel are burned in a car or truck engine to produce power,
they produce numerous tailpipe emissions including:
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO)
  • Carbon Dioxide (CO2)
  • Oxides of Nitrogen (Nox)
  • Particulate Matter (PM)  
  • Unburned Hydrocarbons

    Just a 10% increase in public transportation ridership in the five largest US cities would save over 85 million gallons of gasoline per year.

    Currently, vehicles on the road account for more than 25% of all air pollution nationwide.
    Car exhaust contributes 60% of all carbon monoxide emission in the US.

    In numerous cities across the country, the personal automobile is the single greatest polluter since emissions from millions of vehicles on the road add up. Driving a private car is probably your most “polluting” everyday activity.

    Seventy - five percent of all automobile trips are not related to work or school commutes.
    US commuters would save 600,000 gallons of gas every day if they carpooled with just one person.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Efforts by government and industry since 1970 have greatly reduced typical vehicle emissions. However, in the same number
of years, the number of miles we drive has more than doubled! 

Keep Your Car (And Us) Healthy

  • Cars with soft tires take up to 5% more energy to operate.
  • The average well-maintained car emits 33 pounds of pollution every 100 miles. 
    Cars that are not in compliance with state emission standards emit approximately 5 times that amount.
Recipe for Ground Level Ozone
In large blue sky:
Mix:
Volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) released from gasoline, paints, and solvents. Evaporate.
Stir in: Nitrogen oxide gases (Nox) released from cars and factories that burn fossil fuels.
Bake in: Heat and sunlight to trigger a chemical reaction to transform the emissions into ozone.



   
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